Errorscope 2020 Table of Contents

Articles in the January/February 2020 Issue of CONECA’s ErrorScope include:

Tiny, Copper, and As Beat Up As Possible?
By Mark Benvenuto

For those of us who avidly look for error coins, what are now considered medieval coins can be both a blessing and a curse.

Clipped/Incomplete Planchet Mint Error
Jefferson Nickels
By Denny Polly

One of my favorite mint error coin types is “Struck on Clipped Planchet Mint Error Coins”. These are also more recently being called “Struck on Incomplete Planchet Mint Errors” and that is the more accurate technical description.


1964-D Jefferson 5 Clips Including Two Sets of Overlapping Clips

PAN Show’s VAM-4 Find


The last two issues of ErrorScope have included articles by Mr. John Cava about a pair of Peace Dollar VAMS in his collection. Since I am also a Peace Dollar collector, I decided to take up Mr. Cava’s challenge and see if I could find VAMs in my own modest collection.

A Rundown of 2009 DDR Varieties
By Jude Arnold

FS-01-2009-808

CONECA Announces the 2020 Literary Awards Program

Treasures Among Treasure
1968 D Lincoln Cent – The Rare Doubled Die Reverse
by Dr. Ron Brown

I was recently asked why I title my articles “Treasures among Treasure”. As you likely already surmised, I like describing coins I have attributed or own (with very rare exception) often found from within my coin accumulations – if you will, a treasure hunt within my already accumulated treasures – thus, “Treasures among Treasure”. In so doing, I hope to encourage others to make sure that they too have examined their coins for varieties and hopefully find a treasure.

Close-up of the notching of the T in states

Young Numismatists Program
by Logan Wostyn

Cuve’s Error-Variety-Clash Round Up 7
By Jason Cuvelier

As much as you would expect a state sponsored Mint to employ reasonable quality control measures, you have to love when they don not and things go wrong in a dramatic way. In the past I have been showcasing some nice doubled dies from Brazil, India, Columbia the U.S. and Britain. I have recently been able to track down a number of nicer doubled dies from Malaysia and will be periodically showcasing some of them.

2007 Malaysia 10 SEN DDR

I am happy to include another member find from CONECA member Zeppo Young who sent in a
2016 North Dakota ATB Quarter. I was able to add it the files on MadDieClashes.com as 2016 ADC-25c-2016-01-RO (or ADC-2016-01 shortened). On the reverse we RTY clashed in the stream as well as OD above the saddle behind Roosevelt.

2016 Washington Quarter (ATB) ADC-25c-2016-01-RO

Below is another submission, this is from CONECA member Robert Umbarger, which is an 1883O
Morgan clashed dies that I identified as being Vam-14.

Lastly this is issue I have acquired the plate coin for ADC-1c-1960D-01(LD) which also happens to
have RPM-099 in something closer to MDS. There is no current stage information in the CONECA files for this stage, coupled with a hit on the mintmark, it was not easy to verify the RPM attribution. Coupled with the time to make an overlay to check for MM position, it took some additional time to light it in a way that I could compare details and convince myself that the attribution was indeed correct. Detail shots of the RPM and die clashing are below.

1960D Lincoln Cent RPM-099 & ADC-1c-1960D-01(LD)

Read these articles by logging into your online CONECA account or become a member today to enjoy the latest issues.

Anybody wanting to join CONECA should contact Maria Rickert – Kittell at P.O. Box 233, Armada, MI 48005 or email maria@conecaonline.org

A copy of the application form may be download at http://conecaonline.org/content/join.html. Annual dues are as follows: Adult Member $25.00 per year, Young Numismatist (online Errorscope only) $7.50 per year or (online Errorscope plus mailed hard copy) $17.50.

CONECA members wishing to receive a login username and password to access the Errorscope Online Members Only area, please email the Membership Coordinator, Maria Rickert – Kittell at the address listed above. A valid email address on file with CONECA is required for access to current and back issues of the Errorscope online.

 


 

Articles in the March/April 2020 Issue of CONECA’s ErrorScope include:

Nominations Sought
For the 2020 Hall of Fame
By JC Stevens

Each year, one CONECA member may be inducted into the CONECA Hall of Fame. Any CONECA member in good standing may nominate a member for induction into the Hall of Fame.

Last year Xan Chamberlain was the 2019 inductee into the CONECA Hall of Fame. He joins twenty three CONECA members who have been voted into the Hall of Fame over the last 32 years for their accomplishments, dedicated service, and achievements directly connected to the field of numismatic errors and varieties.

See a list of Hall of Fame Inductees HERE

A list of members who are eligible for the CONECA 2020 Hall of Fame Award are listed below in alphabetical order. The list may not be complete, so if you know another member that you qualifies and who is not listed, please let us know by sending his or her name to JC Stevens at JCStevens43@gmail.com

Any CONECA member in good standing may nominate a member for induction into the Hall of Fame. Here’s how to do it!

Select a person who has been a CONECA member for 10 or more years and who qualifies in either the “Life Service Achievement” or “Educator/Researcher” classification. (see below)
Send his/her name to JC Stevens at JCStevens43@gmail.com, by May 1, 2020.

The “Life Service Achievement” – Reflects the culmination of a career of dedicated service to CONECA in the field of numismatic errors and varieties and not merely recognition of the candidate’s current level of achievement. The candidate must possess at least three (3) of the following criteria to qualify under this classification:
1. Has been awarded the Dr. Lyndon King Award for outstanding member of the year.
2. Has received three (3) different types of CONECA Literary Awards or has had articles published in Errorscope for five (5) different years.
3. Has received either type of Cherrypickers’ Award.
4. Has received a Kenny Knapp Membership Recruitment Award.
5. Has served two terms as a CONECA officer or member of the Board of Directors.
6. Has served as an official CONECA appointee (Librarian, Auctioneer, Examiner, Attributer, etc.) for at least two (2) years.

The “Educator/Researcher” – Reflects achieving prominence or acquiring a personal identification within the field of numismatic errors and varieties. The contributions to the error/variety hobby must be of an enduring nature and not merely recognition of the candidate’s current level of achievement. The candidate must possess at least three (3) of the following criteria to qualify under this classification:
1. Has taught a full term Error/Variety course for the ANA Summer Seminar.
. Has presented a Numismatic Theatre Seminar for the ANA on errors or varieties.
3. Has written and published an original research book or web site on errors or varieties.
4. Has served as a CONECA examiner or attributer for at least five (5) years.
5. Has an extensive portfolio of published articles on errors or varieties in the Numismatic Press, but primarily in Errorscope.
6. Has won first place in the ANA Exhibit Class 17 for errors and varieties.

The Recognitions Chair will review all nominations and pare the list down to no more than three qualified nominees. The CONECA Officers and Board of Directors will vote, and one candidate will be chosen for induction into the CONECA Hall of Fame.

Everything Is Not What It Seems To Be
By Bill Fivaz, NLG
The Scene: Metropolitan Coin Club Meeting,
Atlanta, GA
The Time: Saturday, March 2, 2019
The Subject: Incredible Multi-struck Lincoln Cent

Sitting at my mini-bourse table at a recent coin club meeting, a young man approached and said he had been referred to me by another club member. He said he had a coin that he thought “was something special”. Danny explained that he had purchased the coin (in a plastic key ring) at the souvenir shop at the U.S. Mint headquarters in Washington, D.C. He noticed that it just “didn’t look right” and asked me what I thought. …

Clipped/Incomplete Planchet Mint Error
Washington Quarters
By Denny Polly1(9)XX-D Silver Washington 10% Ragged Clip @ K-6 Obverse

One of my favorite mint error coin types is “Struck on Clipped Planchet Mint Error Coins”. These are also more recently being called “Struck on Incomplete Planchet Mint Errors” and that is the more accurate technical description.

1882 O/S Morgan Dollar VAM 5
by John Cava


The Morgan Dollar minted from 1878 to 1921 is arguably the most popular series collected after the Lincoln Cent. Although putting together a complete set, regardless of grade, can be an expensive venture, there are many ways to collect within the Morgan series. One-a-year is popular, collecting a specific mintmark is popular, and collecting one of each mintmark is also popular. I am going to introduce you to yet another way of collecting Morgans that can be loads of fun while warming your error and variety loving hearts. This is the Morgan Dollar VAM Top 100 collection.

A Happy Holiday Find
By Chris Corwin


Most of us who collect coins have had the experience of a family member asking us to look at their collection and provide an opinion on value. Often, they are disappointed to hear their years of collecting didn’t aren’t going to make them wealthy. This isn’t a particularly pleasant experience for all involved. But a recent experience I had confirms we should all have faith. …

Education + Interest = YNs Receiving
CONECA Memberships
By Bob Mellor


Left to right – Feltner, Carroll, Mellor, Colley with Brendan Carroll holding his copy of ErrorScope.

What better way to spend an October weekend than to engage in the hobby you enjoy, and learn alongside others who share your passion. That’s exactly what 22 adult and 3 Young Numismatist (YN) students did in Port St. Lucie Florida for two full days of instruction on the “Fundamentals of Coin Grading”, sponsored by the Treasure Coast Coin Club of Fort Pierce, Florida.

Treasures Among Treasure
New RPM 1934 D Washington Quarter Combination with DDO
by Dr. Ron Brown


1934 D 25c RPM-001

I recently was given a 1934 D Washington Quarter to attribute for a friend. It was clear that it was ODV-002 with DDO-002 in a LDS but not with RPM-001 or RPM-002 but another yet listed by CONECA.

Cuve’s Error-Variety-Clash Round Up 8
By Jason Cuvelier


Like usual, I will be focusing on a mix of clashes, doubled dies and other die maladies. To start, below is a strong clashed dies with slightly greater than 5% misalignment (there is also some slight rotation and possibly some tilt). Naked eye obvious, this is one of the strongest Lincoln clashes I have encountered. I am including an overlay and detail shots. The struck coin has no misalignment or rotation and shows no abrasion, the steps from the clash to struck coin would seem unusual, could a struck example exist that is shows a similar misalignment and clash?

Read these articles by logging into your online CONECA account or become a member today to enjoy the latest issues.

Anybody wanting to join CONECA should contact Maria Rickert – Kittell at P.O. Box 233, Armada, MI 48005 or email maria@conecaonline.org

A copy of the application form may be download at http://conecaonline.org/content/join.html. Annual dues are as follows: Adult Member $25.00 per year, Young Numismatist (online Errorscope only) $7.50 per year or (online Errorscope plus mailed hard copy) $17.50.

CONECA members wishing to receive a login username and password to access the Errorscope Online Members Only area, please email the Membership Coordinator, Maria Rickert – Kittell at the address listed above. A valid email address on file with CONECA is required for access to current and back issues of the Errorscope online.

2019 CONECA Awards
By JC Stevens

The annual CONECA Errorama Banquet Dinner was held at the Carlucci Restaurant in Rosemont, IL. At the banquet award winners for 2019 were announced and handed to those who attended. For the award winners who were unable to attend the banquet the award will be mailed to the address you provided.

Congratulations to all those listed below.

Xan Chamberlain was named to CONECA Hall of Fame
Xan Chamberlain was named to CONECA Hall of Fame for a “Life Service Achievement Hall of Fame award” which reflects the culmination of a career of dedicated service to CONECA in the field of numismatic errors and varieties

2019 Dr. Lyndon King Outstanding Member
Robert Mills was named the 2019 Dr. Lyndon Outstand Member. This award was begun in 1986 to honor Dr. Lyndon King for his generous monetary contributions to CONECA.

2019 Kenny Knapp Award
Two classes of Kenny Knapp Awards will be given to qualifying individuals or other entities (such as commercial web sites, educational websites, publishers, coauthors of self-published books, etc.).
Bob Mellor is the Annual Recruiter
This award is given annually to the individual/entity sponsoring the most new members in an awards year.
Al Raddi (58) & James Motley (52) Reached 50 Member Recruiter Award
This award is for individuals/entities when they reach 25, 50 and 100 recruitments.

2019 Literary Awards
The Literary Recognitions is for all persons publishing qualifying material in Errorscope or on the club web site. This year the follow winners were awarded a paperweight.

Leroy Van Allen
Mark Benvenuto
Dr. Ron Brown
Joseph Cronin
Jason Cuvelier
Isaiah Hageman
Hunter Hicks
Hayden T. Howard
Jimmy Krozel
Julian Krozel
Mark Lighterman
Bob Mellor
John H. Miller Jr.
James Motley
Denny Polly
Ken Potter
Al Raddi
Maria Rickert-Kittell
Benjamin C. Simpson
O.T. Thompson
Mike Wallace
Logan Wostyn
Jeff Ylitalo
James Zimmerman

 


 

Articles in the May/June 2020 Issue of CONECA’s ErrorScope include:

Young Numismatists Program
by Logan Wostyn

Hello Everyone!!!Hope you all are doing well and avoiding the ick that’s going around. Since we are all stuck at home I thought I would pull from the last Errorscope for our quiz. All your answers can be found in the last issue. The first 3 YN’s to send me all 10 correct answers will receive a prize. Also below you will find an article about a coin show that one of our YNs went to. Have fun, enjoy and be safe.
1) Denny Polly wrote what article?
2) How many Varieties were found in the 2009 Lincoln cent with the 4 different backs?
3) How does a Curved Clip happen?
4) How does a Ragged Clip happen?
5) What is VAM?
6) In what year did the mint start using the single squeeze method?
7) What article did Jude Arnald write?
8) Which 2009 reverse has doubling in the form of an extra long forefinger?
9) What is the mintage of the 1968D Lincoln cent?
10) What coin is pictured with a strongly separated repunched mintmark?

My Last Coin Show
by Christopher B

The last weekend in August, just a few weeks after my birthday, I found myself browsing an assortment of tables and dealers on the most exciting day of the year. I was at the Ohio State Coin Show, the largest show around the area, and the biggest I have been to yet. Being two-and-a-half hours from my house, it took quite the persuading to get my parents to drive me there. With visions of all of the coins and people I would see, those two hours felt like days….

Two Errors for the Price of One? A Russian 2 Kopek
By Mark Benvenuto

I confess that as time has gone on, I have looked more intently for coins that I might classify as errors when I look through any dealer’s stock. Some pieces that I might have passed by I take a renewed interest in if there is something not quite right….

Dual Country – Double Denomination Panama 1c Double Struck on U.S. Lincoln Cent
By CW4 Jeff Ylitalo, USA (ret)

This major mint error is a lustrous 1982 Panama 1 Centesimo Double Struck on a previously struck United States cu 1982 Lincoln Cent. The coin rotated 90 degrees CCW after the first strike with a beautiful second strike that is 30% off-center.

Treasures Among Treasure
“It is not the word that commands the story; it’s the ear”
by Dr. Ron Brown

1984 DDO-001 (FS-101) Doubling is ear outline below the primary ear detail.

I think some Lincoln cent collectors are going to be surprised by the number and dates of Lincoln Double Dies that show doubling of the ear. As best I could, I have included here a current list that I compiled and it is not intended to be comprehensive.

Discrepancy Found in Long-Used Standard for Mint Mark Style Listings San Francisco Mint Mark Punch Used in the 40’s and 50’s Reemerged Decades Later.
by Will Brooks

Figure 1. A 1942 S Mint mark (left) and a 1974 S Mint mark (right).

The long-used industry standard for identifying the different Mint Mark styles used over the years was established by Dr. James Wiles and can be seen at his varietyvista website, www.varietyvista.com. In the November, 2018 issue of Coin World Monthly, I explained the features of the San Francisco Mint mark style listed by Dr. Wiles as MMS-009 (Mint Mark Style-009). According to Wiles’ listings, this punch came into service in 1974 and was used until 1979. This was a bad-looking punch which had a series of defects. Assuming that this punch was brought into service in 1974, I concluded in that article that this punch must have been made with those defects and that they were not the result of the punch’s deterioration from over-use. I have since discovered that this conclusion was incorrect.

Examples of Off Metal Errors on U.S. and Philippine Coinage
By Benjamin C. Simpson, YN, and John L. Simpson

1961 Jefferson Nickel

Off metal or wrong planchet errors occur when a planchet for one coin is struck by a press intended for a different denomination. They are among the most interesting and prized errors and can occur in numerous ways. Between 1855 and 1984, the United States Mint produced coins for 43 different countries ranging from Australia to Venezuela (interestingly, official sanction did not come until The Mint Act of 1874). Sometimes these foreign planchets were struck by American dies. This article will focus on wrong planchet errors created during the U.S. production of Philippine coinage.

CONECA Booth,
National Money Show, Atlanta 2020

From Left to Right. CONECA Members, Dr. Ron Brown, Mike Ellis – ANA Governor

The national Money show had many highlights from the exciting interaction of new collectors interested in CONECA and the interaction with the many who already are members. It was and is an honor to represent!

Can Intent Define an Error Coin
by Al Raddi

Figure 1. Obverse of the Portugal 1999 100-escudo coin with the name of the issuing country spelled incorrectly in the legend PORTUGUSA

A simple definition of an error coin is: a coin that was manufactured incorrectly. However, what if a coin was manufactured correctly but designed incorrectly – is it an error coin?

CONECA Elections 2020
By Ken Potter

Are you interested in serving on CONECA’s Board? If so, submit your Election platform by July 15, 2020 to editor@conecaonline.org. All platforms will be published in the September/October 2020 issue of Errorscope Election Ballots will be printed and inserted into the September/October 2020 issue of Errorscope.

Cuve’s Error-Variety-Clash Round Up 9
By Jason Cuvelier

Never assume, my mentor in graduate school would tell me. I try not to. On my scope appeared to be a die clash we had listed with a counter clash listed as CCL(T1)-50c-1983P-01. It was matching the photos, but there seemed to be additional clashing.

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Read all of these Errorscope articles and more by logging onto your online CONECA account or become a member today to enjoy the latest issues.

CONECA members who need a login username and password to access the Errorscope Online Members Only area, should email the Membership Coordinator, Maria Rickert – Kittell. A valid email address on file with CONECA is required for access to current and back issues of the Errorscope online.

Donations to CONECA
CONECA is a 501 (c) (3) tax – exempt charity and public supported organization as defined in
sections 170 (b) (1) (A) (vi) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donations to CONECA are tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law. Federal ID #46-0343568.
Mail Donations To: CONECA Treasurer – 472 Cherry Lane Rd., Friedens, PA 15541

 


 

Articles in the July/August 2020 Issue of CONECA’s ErrorScope include:

CONECA State Representatives Program Update
by James Motley

We are off and running! 22 States have one CONECA State Representative and several have more. We also have two Representatives in Canada from the provinces of Alberta, and Ontario. If you would like to become a State Representative please email me, James Motley at Coneca@Alpinecomputers.net and request consideration.

Where in the World Are CONECA Members?
By Maria Rickert-Kittell CONECA Membership Coordinator

CONECA has 774 members as of May 25, 2020. Our fellow error enthusiasts are mainly located in the United States with 756 members, and one member from the territory of Puerto Rico. Each of the fifty states has at least one member. Canada comes next with eleven members. Six additional countries also have a CONECA member.

Some Monster Standing Liberty Quarter Errors
By Robert H. Knauss

I have been collecting Standing Liberty Quarter errors for twenty years and have written pretty extensively on that subject. During that time, I have run across some amazing major errors and wanted to share a few of my favorites with you.

Treasures Among Treasure
Ostensibly a Misplaced Mint Mark on the Reverse of a 1962 Proof Franklin Half
by Dr. Ron Brown

Note the D’s location SE of the letter W in STOW

There are some interesting varieties in the Franklin series but none more so than the unusual anomalous “D” on the reverse of the 1962 Proof Franklin Half Dollar, FS-901. Where this supposed “D” comes from is anyone guess.

Another Look at a Key Feature of the 1883 O VAM 33
By John Roberts

A bank of lathes in the Philadelphia Mint as pictured in the Annual Report of the Director of the Mint in 1902. These could be used both for shaping the edges of medals and turning off displaced metal from dies between hubbing blows. Either operation would produce numerous small shards of metal in this room.

In my typical work day I examine a significant number of Morgan Dollar varieties. Most of these pieces have become well-traveled ground for me, but there are some that capture my attention and warrant a closer look. These may become subjects of my monthly column About VAMs that is published in Coin World. On rare occasion, I’ll encounter something that inspires a far more detailed investigation.

VAM 2A Earring Crown Peace Dollar
By John Cava

1922-P VAM 2A. Often referred to as the Earring variety.

It’s often said that patience is a virtue and I am normally a virtuous man. But the other day I gave up waiting and pulled the trigger on one of the “Crown Jewels” of the Top 50 Peace Dollar VAMs. As you may recall, the Top 50 Peace Dollar VAMs are just a small sub-group of the 100’s of identified Peace Dollar VAMs. These 50 are singled out because they are visible to the naked eye, well at least younger eyes.

Young Numismatists Program
by Logan Wostyn

Hello Everyone! OK Yn’s, this next one is an easy one. Who is your Mentor and Why? Doesn’t have to be a long article. Just give us background on who and what got you started collecting.
Stay safe everyone.
Logan

Paper Money Errors: The Offset Printing
By Benjamin C. Simpson, YN


This series 1977 $10 note exhibits a partial offset

Few paper money mistakes are more captivating than the offset. It is easy to understand why this error type is so popular; their impressive appearance and affordability make them a perfect entry point for currency collectors.

Modern Lincoln Cents Plagued by Striations
Commonplace but Puzzling Planchet Error Explained
by Will Brooks
edited by Mike Diamond

Extreme example of a striated planchet found among many minor examples by Steve Wilhite of Arizona in a solid date 2018D Loomis original bank-wrapped roll.

Ever since the Mint began striking Lincoln cents on copper-plated zinc planchets, the occasional cent with thin parallel striations would turn up. Recently, the frequency and severity of this phenomenon has gone up dramatically.

A Bit of CONECA History
By Michael S. Fey, Ph.D.
Attributor of Silver Dollars for CONECA

I bought a collection and found this piece of CONECA history in the lot. It will be of interest to readers who have a long history with our association.

Distinguishing a Folded Over Rim Fin from a Rim Cud on United States Coins
by Pete Apple

In order to determine whether a feature is a rim cud or a folded over rim fin, I try to envision the die which produced the feature. In many instances, we will find a feature which covers anywhere from 45º to 100º on the rim around the circumference of the coin.

In the photo above, the length of the cud exceeds ≈ ½ the radius of the coin and is no longer a rim cud because the break has encroached into the area of the field.

Cuve’s Error-Variety-Clash Round Up 10
By Jason Cuvelier

Chile 2001 5 peso DDO

You have to wonder about what exactly happens in some Mints around the world were you can have some of these weird mishaps causing crazy die errors, at the same time, from an error and variety numismatic standpoint, it is rather cool to be able to study these mistakes.

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Read all of these Errorscope articles and more by logging onto your online CONECA account or become a member today to enjoy the latest issues.

CONECA members who need a login username and password to access the Errorscope Online Members Only area, should email the Membership Coordinator, Maria Rickert – Kittell. A valid email address on file with CONECA is required for access to current and back issues of the Errorscope online.

Donations to CONECA
CONECA is a 501 (c) (3) tax – exempt charity and public supported organization as defined in
sections 170 (b) (1) (A) (vi) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donations to CONECA are tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law. Federal ID #46-0343568.
Mail Donations To: CONECA Treasurer – 472 Cherry Lane Rd., Friedens, PA 15541

 


 

Articles in the September/October 2020 Issue of CONECA’s ErrorScope include:

James Motley
Hall of Fame 2020 Inductee
By Logan Wostyn

It is my honor to be able to write this article. James Motley (Jim to most) has been involved with CONECA for the last 10 years.

 

1930-S Standing Liberty Quarter “Disappearing Date” Variety Revisited
By Robert H. Knauss and Gary Hamm

I have always been fascinated with what I refer to as the 1930-S “disappearing date” variety. It is listed in my book Standing Liberty Quarter Varieties & Errors (2d. ed.) as K-0020. It is one of my favorite varieties because it involves an interesting die break progression that can be found in several different die stages.

 

Treasures Among Treasure
New Discovery 2017 D Class VIII Double Die Lincoln Or Not?
by Dr. Ron Brown

Doubled Ear seen without magnification

There seems to be a surge recently of type VIII double die coins (off set hub doubling) since the introduction of the single squeeze method of die creation. Recently I discovered a new class VIII off set hub doubled 2017 D Lincoln cent that was verified by Dr. Wiles.

 

2020 CONECA Election Platforms

In this issue you will find the 2020 election platforms for CONECA Board candidates along with a tip in sheet to mark and vote with. It can be mailed to our current President, James Motely, at the address listed in your issue. We encourage you to vote and make your opinions heard.

 

Cause of Thin, Tapered Peripheral
Lettering Explained
By Will Brooks

1996D cent from uncirculated Mint set with tapered lettering toward the periphery. The bottom is a normal cent for comparison.

I was recently approached by a collector who had discovered something unusual as he was searching through 1996 uncirculated mint sets. He found numerous sets whose Denver-minted Lincoln cents had thin, tapered letters on the periphery.

CONECA Awards
By JC Stevens

Every year at the annual Errorama CONECA recognizes members for their service and contributions. For more information on current and past Awards recipients see our Awards pages from the main menu.

 

Are They Errors If All the Coins Have the Same Problem?
By Mark Benvenuto


Left, the “Ub” side and right, the “Trident” side

Few paper money mistakes are more captivating than the offset. It is easy to understand why this error type is so popular; their impressive appearance and affordability make them a perfect entry point for currency collectors.

 

An “Altered” Viewpoint on Collecting Some Fake U.S. Mint Errors
by Joe Cronin

Left, 1944 “No P” Henning Obverse and right, 1944 “No P” Henning Reverse with “Lopped R”

In numismatics, perhaps the only thing more frightening, embarrassing, and heart-breaking than discovering a prized coin you own has been designated as “damaged” is when you learn it is actually a “fake/ counterfeit” or an “altered” coin.

 

Young Numismatists Program
by Logan Wostyn

Hello everyone!!! Hope you are all doing ok with all this craziness thats going on. Being stuck at home and not being able to do a lot i was wondering if any of you have gone through your collections lately? I want you to pick out one coin and send me a picture of it and tell me how you found it and what type its is.

 

1961 Franklin Double Die Half Dollar
By Steven Couzzo

I have been collecting US silver coins for some time now, mostly 1930 to 1970. My collection is comprised of Washington quarter sets, Franklin half Dollar, Roosevelt dimes and I have most of the mint and proof sets from 1955 to 1964 also. I was working on putting together graded proof sets starting with 1961, 1962, and 1963 so I purchased this 1961 Franklin Half Dollar proof, graded PF68, on EBay to complete that years set. I am a blind gentleman who has very little sight left so when I received the coin,I used adaptive technology to enlarge the coins so I may see their details better.

Cuve’s Error-Variety-Clash Round Up 11
By Jason Cuvelier

Chile 2001 5 peso DDO1943 Lincoln Cent ADC-1c-1943-01 & DDO-015


1984P Kennedy ADC-50c-1984P-01


Morgan Dollar ADC-100c-1884O-01 (VAM-5a)

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Read all of these Errorscope articles and more by logging onto your online CONECA account or become a member today to enjoy the latest issues.

CONECA members who need a login username and password to access the Errorscope Online Members Only area, should email the Membership Coordinator, Maria Rickert – Kittell. A valid email address on file with CONECA is required for access to current and back issues of the Errorscope online.

Donations to CONECA
CONECA is a 501 (c) (3) tax – exempt charity and public supported organization as defined in
sections 170 (b) (1) (A) (vi) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donations to CONECA are tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law. Federal ID #46-0343568.
Mail Donations To: CONECA Treasurer – 472 Cherry Lane Rd., Friedens, PA 15541

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